Create Your Own Color Wheel

Color Wheel on Paper PlateWhy purchase pre-mixed paint colors when students can learn to mix their own colors for more variety and more interesting results?  Making a color wheel teaches students how to mix the colors they want while learning the basics of color theory!

You will need:

  • Paper plates, 2 per student (one for a palette, one for the color wheel)
  • Color wheel templates, cut out and glued onto “uncoated” paper plates (paint adheres best to the “uncoated” plates, and they’re cheaper, too!)
  • Tempera paint: red (or magenta), yellow, and blue (or turquoise)… I like to use magenta and turquoise for color mixing since they’re closest in color to the magenta and cyan inks used in the four color printing process – magenta, yellow, cyan, and black. 
  • Water in small plastic containers (I like the clear, pint size containers from the deli)
  • Medium size brushes
  • Paper towels
  • Color wheel poster (optional)

Vocabulary:

  • Primary Color – red, yellow, or blue (a color that can’t be created by mixing other colors)
  • Secondary Color – orange, green, or violet (a color created by mixing two primary colors together)
  • Intermediate Color – a color created by mixing a primary color with a secondary color (ex. “yellow-orange”)
  • Tertiary Color – a brown or gray created by mixing all three primary colors together
  • Complimentary Colors – two colors directly across from each other on the color wheel (ex. yellow and violet, red and green, or blue and orange)

Directions:

 for grades 1 and 2…

1.  Introduce the primary colors: red, yellow, and blue. Have students paint along with you as you  demonstrate….

Primary Colors on a palette

2.  Turn your color wheel template so that the triangle labeled “yellow” is at the top.  Then paint a swatch of yellow along the rim of your paper plate, where the triangle labeled “yellow” is pointing.
3.  Rinse your brush and blot any excess water on a paper towel.
4.  Paint the red swatch and the blue swatch in the same way, rinsing and blotting your brush each time you change colors.

Color Wheel with Primary Colors

5.  Next, introduce the secondary colors (orange, green, and violet).  Mix two primary colors to paint each secondary color in its appropriate place.

Color Wheel with Primary and Secondary Colors

Continue with the intermediate colors for grades 3, 4, and 5…

6.  Paint an intermediate color  between each primary and secondary color. For each intermediate color, mix some of the primary color with the secondary color next to it, adding just a tiny amount of the darker color to a larger amount of the lighter color. (The name of an intermediate color always begins with its dominant primary color, followed by its secondary color, such as “yellow-orange” or “blue-green”.)  

Color Wheel with Primary, Secondary, and Intermediate Colors

7.  Tertiary colors are the browns and grays you get when you mix the three primary colors together.  Your browns and grays will vary depending on the amounts you mix of each primary color. Mix a tertiary color and paint a swatch of it in the center of your color wheel. Save your color wheel where you can refer to it often!

Color Wheel with Primary, Secondary, Intermediate and Tertiary Colors

For a printable 7 page pdf of this project (including my color wheel template), please visit my new Teachers Pay Teachers store!

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16 Responses to Create Your Own Color Wheel

  1. Deceptively Educational May 21, 2013 at 2:08 pm #

    What a great idea!!! My son would think so too. Thanks for sharing. I’d love it if you’d add this link to the After School Linky Party on my blog right now!
    Deceptively Educational recently posted..After School Linky Party!My Profile

  2. Sherry May 22, 2013 at 7:36 am #

    Hi, Thanks for this posting. I am not trained in the fine arts so I have been ‘feeling’ my way through 3 junior high courses (middle school for you I believe) . I really value your blog for the continued inspiration it gives me. However, I used this idea for a French class to launch us into other describing words. It was very useful as a ‘differentiation exercise’ to connect to the grammar topic at hand.

    • Cheryl Trowbridge May 27, 2013 at 9:37 pm #

      That’s great, Sherry! I love hearing how the same lesson is used in different ways. Glad it was helpful to you!!

    • Cheryl Trowbridge May 27, 2013 at 9:40 pm #

      That’s great, Sherry! It’s fun to hear how the same lesson can be used in different ways, and how you can connect it to other areas of the curriculum. Thanks for sharing!!

    • Lilian September 24, 2014 at 9:07 pm #

      Would you please share how you used it for your French class? I’d like to do this with my Spanish class, and I’m trying to figure out the best way to go about assigning this project to practice Spanish colors.

  3. Arielle July 14, 2013 at 5:11 pm #

    This is so wonderful. It’s interesting to see how others teach this. I believe that this is a great tool to look back on to pick a color for a project. Thanks for sharing this! :)
    Arielle recently posted..What To Do…My Profile

  4. April July 22, 2013 at 6:20 am #

    I just bought your lesson plan from TPT and can’t wait to use it in my color unit!

  5. Lina Fairley November 22, 2013 at 8:33 am #

    Really enjoy the simplicity of directions and low budget for HIGH end results. I allowed students to mix paint colors at each step. Students enjoyed seeing, secondary and intermediate colors appear in front of them. Will use it every year.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Reflection – Teach Kids Art Blog – Paper Plate Color Wheel » Beth McKinzie - July 19, 2013

    […] found a neat idea for a color wheel on the Teach Kids Art Blog. The students can create a color wheel from a paper plate. Using the primary colors (red, yellow, and blue) students will mix the colors […]

  2. Reflection – Teach Kids Art Blog – Paper Plate Color Wheel » Beth McKinzie - July 19, 2013

    […] found a neat idea for a color wheel on the Teach Kids Art Blog. The students can create a color wheel from a paper plate. Using the primary colors (red, yellow, and blue) students will mix the colors […]

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