Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!

I don’t usu­ally repost projects that I’ve posted before, but this one is spe­cial and too good to miss!  This week (March 2nd) we’ll cel­e­brate a very spe­cial birth­day in our Kinder­garten classes.… that of beloved children’s author/illustrator, Theodor Seuss Geisel, aka “Dr. Seuss”.  In his life­time, Dr. Seuss pub­lished over 40 children’s books which have inspired both read­ing and imag­i­na­tion for gen­er­a­tions of chil­dren.  His birth­day has fit­tingly been adopted as the date for the annual “National Read Across Amer­ica Day”, an ini­tia­tive of the National Edu­ca­tion Asso­ci­a­tion.  To honor Dr. Seuss on his spe­cial day, my kinders cre­ated Seuss-inspired crea­tures of their own, based on his book, “There’s a Wocket in My Pocket”.  I think Dr. Seuss would have been proud of these charm­ing, imag­i­na­tive creatures!

Mate­ri­als: 

  • 12x18 white con­struc­tion paper
  • pen­cil
  • black “F” Sharpie
  • crayons (some bro­ken with paper peeled off)
  • jig­gle eyes and white craft glue (optional)

Direc­tions:

1. Read the story, There’s a Wocket in My Pocket, by Dr. Seuss.  Ask stu­dents to pay spe­cial atten­tion to the fun rhyming pat­tern and to what each of the crea­tures illus­trated in the story have in com­mon (long, skinny arms, legs, necks, tails, fin­gers, and toes… stripes, polka dots, bright col­ors… crazy hair, fur… big eyes, eye­lashes, etc.).

2. Work­ing ver­ti­cally on your paper, lightly sketch a cir­cle or oval just above the mid­dle of your paper.  Then lightly sketch a larger cir­cle or oval just below the mid­dle of your paper.  Make sure you leave some empty space between them.  Now put your pen­cil away… you’ll be fin­ish­ing your draw­ing just using your Sharpie! (It’s harder for Kinders to trace over their pen­cil lines than it is to just “go for it”!)

3. Using the two shapes you drew as guide­lines, draw some fur on both shapes with a zig-zag line using your Sharpie.

4. Then, con­nect the two shapes with a long, skinny neck.  Add long, skinny arms, legs, fin­gers, toes, tail, etc.  Don’t for­get some feath­ery, crazy hair!  Fill your whole paper… make your feet touch the bot­tom of your paper and your crazy hair-feathers touch the top!  Add stripes and polka dots, eyes (with eye­lashes), nose and mouth.  You can even glue on some jig­gle eyes for extra fun, if you wish!

5. Now, it’s time to name your crea­ture!  Start by think­ing about where he/she might be.  In a park?  At the zoo?  On the beach?  Then make a silly, rhyming word by chang­ing the first let­ter of that word.  Write this on your paper, right above your sig­na­ture.  For exam­ple, my stu­dents cre­ated “A Zark at the Park”, “The Zeach at the Beach”“The Zool in the Pool”, etc.

6. Finally, play “Hide the White Paper”, and color your crea­ture with bright col­ored crayons.  Use the sides of bro­ken crayons (with the paper peeled off) to fill in large areas quickly.  

“Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.”  
                                                                                                                   ~ Dr. Seuss

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20 Responses to Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!

  1. Lori Decoite February 27, 2012 at 5:44 am #

    soo funny.. I save lessons that peo­ple post in word doc­u­ments with links to their sites.. I save this one from last year and did it last week with 2nd graders..they loved it and the fin­ished prod­uct looks great. I will post this week! Thanks for shar­ing your lessons : ).

  2. Snippety Gibbet February 27, 2012 at 5:49 am #

    Thank you so much for the repost. I will teach it this very week.

    jan

  3. Snippety Gibbet February 27, 2012 at 5:56 am #

    I posted a link back to here from my video blog. I’ve also linked to YouTube and “There’s a Wocket in my Pocket.” jan

    http://artroomvideos.blogspot.com/2012/02/dr-seuss-birthdaywocket.html

  4. Shawna February 27, 2012 at 11:25 am #

    These are so cute…I love them!
    Shawna
    The Pic­ture Book Teacher’s Edition

  5. Kirsten Larson February 27, 2012 at 3:12 pm #

    Love this! Thanks for the fan­tas­tic Dr. Suess activity.

  6. Karen February 27, 2012 at 4:19 pm #

    So charm­ing! Those pic­tures just made my whole day brighter! Can’t wait to see what my kids come up with!!!
    Warmly,
    Karen
    http://www.layers-of-learning.com

  7. Hannah- Art.Paper.Scissors.Glue! February 27, 2012 at 6:35 pm #

    love them! theyre adorable!

  8. Melissa @ The Chocolate Muffin Tree March 1, 2012 at 8:26 pm #

    This com­ment has been removed by the author.

  9. Melissa @ The Chocolate Muffin Tree March 1, 2012 at 8:27 pm #

    Love this idea! And love this book?

  10. Janvi March 2, 2012 at 1:24 am #

    This is really an infor­ma­tive blog. Thanks for shar­ing with us. Best schools in Delhi

  11. Mrs. Polizotto March 4, 2012 at 11:56 am #

    Thank you for this great idea! I did this project with my first graders and they loved it! Your direc­tions were great. I liked that it had spe­cific direc­tions of shape place­ment and then it was all cre­ative from there! You can see some of the results on my pin­ter­est board Phipps­burg Elementary.

  12. Miss March 5, 2012 at 11:17 am #

    What fun, whim­si­cal project! Thanks for sharing!

  13. Art Project Girl March 8, 2012 at 8:48 pm #

    So so cute! I for­got about this project! I did it too but a lit­tle dif­fer­ent a few years back and now I’m going to pull it out of my Dr. Seuss folder for tomor­row. Thank you I was pulling my hair out on what to do next with a par­tic­u­lar class who can’t han­dle the paint­ing project the rest of the grade is doing! I think the NAEA is on the West coast next year you should go! TEXAS

  14. Maru Jiménez April 17, 2012 at 3:45 pm #

    I recently tried this project out using dif­fer­ent mate­ri­als and the results were even bet­ter than I ever thought! Thanks for shar­ing!! The results can be seen here: http://martclass.blogspot.com/

  15. Anonymous April 26, 2012 at 9:54 am #

    I love this pictures..they are look­ing beau­ti­ful and awesome.Keep up the good work and thanks for shar­ing it.

  16. laura minala November 24, 2012 at 8:19 am #

    so cute.….… i have the book too.
    but never thought of this idea.
    you guys are amaz­ing!
    thanks!
    p.s sorry 4 for copy­ing ur projects lol

  17. Rina March 20, 2013 at 8:07 pm #

    Hi Cheryl

    I taught your les­son to both the kinder­garten and first grade today. PERFECT! Thanks so much for shar­ing this one.
    Rina recently posted..Peter Max Statue of Lib­erty Round UpMy Profile

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  1. Best Art Projects of the Year: Kindergarten » K - 6 Art - September 2, 2013

    […] Happy Birth­day, Dr. Seuss! plus book There’s a Wocket in My Pocket  by Dr. Seuss (from Teach Kids Art blog). March […]

  2. Celebrating Dr. Seuss « Homeschool Share blog - February 22, 2014

    […] There’s a Wocket in My Pocket art lesson […]

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Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!

 Yes­ter­day (March 2nd) we cel­e­brated a very spe­cial birth­day in our Kinder­garten classes.… that of beloved children’s author/illustrator, Theodor Seuss Geisel, aka “Dr. Seuss”.  In his life­time, Dr. Seuss pub­lished over 40 children’s books which have inspired both read­ing and imag­i­na­tion for gen­er­a­tions of chil­dren.  His birth­day has fit­tingly been adopted as the date for the annual “National Read Across Amer­ica Day”, an ini­tia­tive of the National Edu­ca­tion Asso­ci­a­tion.  To honor Dr. Seuss on his spe­cial day, my kinders cre­ated Seuss-inspired crea­tures of their own, based on his book, “There’s a Wocket in My Pocket”.  I think Dr. Seuss would have been proud of these charm­ing, imag­i­na­tive creatures!

Mate­ri­als:

  • 12x18 white con­struc­tion paper
  • pen­cil
  • black “F” Sharpie
  • crayons (some bro­ken with paper peeled off)
  • jig­gle eyes and white craft glue (optional)

Direc­tions:

1. Read the story, There’s a Wocket in My Pocket, by Dr. Seuss.  Ask stu­dents to pay spe­cial atten­tion to what each of the crea­tures in the story have in com­mon (long, skinny arms, legs, necks, tails, fin­gers, and toes… stripes, polka dots, bright col­ors… crazy hair, fur… big eyes, eye­lashes, etc.).

2. Work­ing ver­ti­cally on your paper, lightly sketch a cir­cle or oval just above the mid­dle of your paper.  Then lightly sketch a larger cir­cle or oval just below the mid­dle of your paper.  Make sure you leave some empty space between them.  Now put your pen­cil away… you’ll be fin­ish­ing your draw­ing just using your Sharpie! (It’s harder for Kinders to trace over their pen­cil lines than it is to just “go for it”!)

3. Using the two shapes you drew as guide­lines, draw some fur on both shapes with a zig-zag line using your Sharpie.

4. Then, con­nect the two shapes with a long, skinny neck.  Add long, skinny arms, legs, fin­gers, toes, tail, etc.  Don’t for­get some feath­ery, crazy hair!  Fill your whole paper… make your feet touch the bot­tom of your paper and your crazy hair-feathers touch the top!  Add stripes and polka dots, eyes (with eye­lashes), nose and mouth.  You can even glue on some jig­gle eyes for extra fun, if you wish!

5. Now, it’s time to name your crea­ture!  Start by think­ing about where he/she might be.  In a park?  At the zoo?  On the beach?  Then make a silly, rhyming word by chang­ing the first let­ter of that word.  Write this on your paper, right above your signature.

6. Finally, play “Hide the White Paper”, and color your crea­ture with bright col­ored crayons.  Use the sides of bro­ken crayons (with the paper peeled off) to fill in large areas quickly.  

“Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.”  
                                                                                                                   ~ Dr. Seuss

, , ,

4 Responses to Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!

  1. Lori Decoite February 27, 2012 at 5:44 am #

    soo funny.. I save lessons that peo­ple post in word doc­u­ments with links to their sites.. I save this one from last year and did it last week with 2nd graders..they loved it and the fin­ished prod­uct looks great. I will post this week! Thanks for shar­ing your lessons : ).

  2. Snippety Gibbet February 27, 2012 at 5:49 am #

    Thank you so much for the repost. I will teach it this very week.

    jan

  3. Snippety Gibbet February 27, 2012 at 5:56 am #

    I posted a link back to here from my video blog. I’ve also linked to YouTube and “There’s a Wocket in my Pocket.” jan

    http://artroomvideos.blogspot.com/2012/02/dr-seuss-birthdaywocket.html

  4. Shawna February 27, 2012 at 11:25 am #

    These are so cute…I love them!
    Shawna
    The Pic­ture Book Teacher’s Edition

  5. Kirsten Larson February 27, 2012 at 3:12 pm #

    Love this! Thanks for the fan­tas­tic Dr. Suess activity.

  6. Karen February 27, 2012 at 4:19 pm #

    So charm­ing! Those pic­tures just made my whole day brighter! Can’t wait to see what my kids come up with!!!
    Warmly,
    Karen
    http://www.layers-of-learning.com

  7. Hannah- Art.Paper.Scissors.Glue! February 27, 2012 at 6:35 pm #

    love them! theyre adorable!

  8. Melissa @ The Chocolate Muffin Tree March 1, 2012 at 8:26 pm #

    This com­ment has been removed by the author.

  9. Melissa @ The Chocolate Muffin Tree March 1, 2012 at 8:27 pm #

    Love this idea! And love this book?

  10. Janvi March 2, 2012 at 1:24 am #

    This is really an infor­ma­tive blog. Thanks for shar­ing with us. Best schools in Delhi

  11. Mrs. Polizotto March 4, 2012 at 11:56 am #

    Thank you for this great idea! I did this project with my first graders and they loved it! Your direc­tions were great. I liked that it had spe­cific direc­tions of shape place­ment and then it was all cre­ative from there! You can see some of the results on my pin­ter­est board Phipps­burg Elementary.

  12. Miss March 5, 2012 at 11:17 am #

    What fun, whim­si­cal project! Thanks for sharing!

  13. Art Project Girl March 8, 2012 at 8:48 pm #

    So so cute! I for­got about this project! I did it too but a lit­tle dif­fer­ent a few years back and now I’m going to pull it out of my Dr. Seuss folder for tomor­row. Thank you I was pulling my hair out on what to do next with a par­tic­u­lar class who can’t han­dle the paint­ing project the rest of the grade is doing! I think the NAEA is on the West coast next year you should go! TEXAS

  14. Maru Jiménez April 17, 2012 at 3:45 pm #

    I recently tried this project out using dif­fer­ent mate­ri­als and the results were even bet­ter than I ever thought! Thanks for shar­ing!! The results can be seen here: http://martclass.blogspot.com/

  15. Anonymous April 26, 2012 at 9:54 am #

    I love this pictures..they are look­ing beau­ti­ful and awesome.Keep up the good work and thanks for shar­ing it.

  16. laura minala November 24, 2012 at 8:19 am #

    so cute.….… i have the book too.
    but never thought of this idea.
    you guys are amaz­ing!
    thanks!
    p.s sorry 4 for copy­ing ur projects lol

  17. Rina March 20, 2013 at 8:07 pm #

    Hi Cheryl

    I taught your les­son to both the kinder­garten and first grade today. PERFECT! Thanks so much for shar­ing this one.
    Rina recently posted..Peter Max Statue of Lib­erty Round UpMy Profile

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